engineering.
Oops! Looks like your browser is out of date. Is this page displaying correctly? If not, try upgrading your browser or use a different one.

National Maritime Museum – Sammy Ofer Wing.

Within the Maritime Greenwich UNESCO World Heritage Site, AKT II has supported a dramatic remodelling at the Grade I-listed National Maritime Museum. The museum’s 1870s-built Sammy Ofer Wing is reconstructed, and is doubled in volume with a new underground extension complete with a new entrance that overlooks Greenwich Park.

At a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a Grade I-listed museum is dramatically remodelled.

Location
London, UK
Client
National Maritime Museum
Architect
C.F. Møller Architects, Purcell
Project Value
£36.5 million
Floor Area
7,300 m²
Status
completed 2011
Expertise
Structures

C. F. Møller Architects conceived the design, which was then developed and delivered by Purcell. All of the wing’s internal structure is replaced, while its historic masonry facades are retained and the 7m-deep extension is excavated just 1.5m from the heritage works. The redeveloped wing houses the world’s largest maritime archive, with a reading room, while the new volume provides exhibition spaces and enhanced public facilities.

By positioning the new volume mostly below ground, the extension integrates within the landscape and preserves visibility to the museum’s Victorian frontage from the Metropolitan Open Land-protected parkland. A new sunken entrance descends into a triple-height atrium that draws visitors to the special-exhibition gallery below. The historic volume is meanwhile totally reconfigured with an open layout that improves visitor circulation and connectivity.

The required, concurrent construction of the extension left no space for temporary external trusses that would otherwise support the existing building’s retained facades. We accordingly designed the historic volume’s replacement four-storey structure to allow construction ‘in situ’ around the existing frame, whereby the facades became supported on the new structure before the old floors, beams and columns were then removed.

Pad foundations, slim-sectioned columns and a concrete raft together allow this constructive agility while minimising any differential settlement. Altogether, this solution proved highly efficient, minimising the required temporary works, and reduced the project’s timeframe by several months.

Throughout both volumes, AKT II’s structural fabric forms part of a holistic building-physics strategy that minimises the energy required in controlling the archive’s humidity and temperature. These measures contribute to the project’s certification of BREEAM Very Good.

Awards.

2012 RIBA Regional Award

2012 Civic Trust Awards – Commendation

2012 NLA Awards – Commendation

'Radiant Lines'
installation
 
 
A Brick for Venice thumbnailA Brick
for Venice.
 
 
One
Gosvenor
Square
 
Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities thumbnailThe Stephen A. Schwarzman
Centre for the Humanities
 
 
Albert Bridge House thumbnailAlbert Bridge House.
 
 
 
Edgar's Sheds thumbnailEdgar's
Sheds.
 
 
Luton     Town FC
Stadium.
 
 
St Pancras Campus thumbnailSt Pancras
Campus.
 
 
Wind Sculpture
(TG) I
 
 
Sentosa
Sensoryscape.
 
 
The
Beacon.
 
 
Liverpool
School of
Architecture.
 
Malaika
School.
 
 
Cherry
Groce
Memorial.
 
Khudi
Bari.
 
 
Haus Gables thumbnailHaus
Gables.
 
 
10   Lewis
Cubitt
Square.
 
'Drift'
footbridge.
 
 
3290_HighRes_render_N9_hdThe
Gaumont.
 
 
5448_N8_hdCrinkle-Crankle
Concrete.
 
 
4926_HiRes_rendering_N7_hdApex
1.
 
 
5008_highRes_image_N3_hdUCB
Headquarters
Campus.
 
Manor    Road
Quarter.
 
 
17 Charterhouse
Street.
 
 
Brent Cross
Plot 15.
 
 
100-West-Cromwell-Road-thumbnail100
West Cromwell
Road.
 
Brent Cross
Plot 25.
 
 
Chapter
London
Bridge.
 
Roatan
Prospera.
 
 
Mount
Pleasant.