engineering.
Oops! Looks like your browser is out of date. Is this page displaying correctly? If not, try upgrading your browser or use a different one.

One Queen Anne’s Gate.

Maple Springfield’s One Queen Anne’s Gate consolidates 12 plots, with a mix of historic and new façades, into a singular residential development. The new, nine-storey building falls within two Conservation Areas, near to St James’ Park in London’s Westminster borough, and appears as a series of townhouses that integrate into the grain and character of the surrounding 18th-century streetscape.

Twelve plots, mixing historic and new façades, are consolidated into a singular residential development

Location
London, UK
Client
Maple Springfield
Architect
PDP London
Project Value
£50 million
Floor Area
10,000 m2
Status
completed 2020
Expertise
Structures

PDP London’s architectural design resolves this external complexity with a rationalised, modern interior, creating 27 luxury apartments, a luxury penthouse and 12 affordable units, while three basement levels provide a gym, spa, lounge and conference room, with an automated parking facility that stacks 33 cars.

The project replaces 6,000 square metres of ageing office stock with 9,000 square metres of modern residential space, adding 3.8 metres of height. The new concrete frame and grid are optimised for residential layouts, with blade columns that integrate within the thickness of separating walls to minimise the structure’s impact upon the interior spaces. Throughout, transfer structures are achieved through local floor-slab thickening while preserving alignment with the windows of the existing frontage. For the upper levels, post-tensioned slabs minimise floorplate thickness and embodied carbon while maximising residential ceiling heights, together supported on lightweight steel columns which transfer through a concrete raft onto the primary frame. The retained façades – which were supported by temporary steel frames during construction – also rest on transfer structures.

AKT II managed the project’s many party-wall negotiations throughout demolition and construction, including controlling ground movement to protect the historic elements. The prior 1960s office stock used concrete floor plates that connected into several shared walls, and we proposed non-vibratory demolition techniques to minimise any disturbance of these surrounding structures and fabric.

Our specification of a raft foundation saved time and money for the client, with the retained Georgian façade now re-supported on this new basement structure, helping to secure the heritage asset’s future.

Arding
&
Hobbs.
 
Grosvenor
Square.
 
 
Horizon
 
Building.
 
Canada
Water
Plot K1.
 
Cadogan
Place.
 
 
CASPAR
I.
 
 
Kivik
Pavilion.
 
 
One
Centaur
Street.
 
Nike
myThread
Pavilion
 
Museum
of the
History of
Science.
2-12
Symons
Street
 
Southwark
Gateway.
 
 
Brindleyplace
Café
 
 
Queen
Mary
Students'
Union.
30
Kensington
Church
Street
Brulington
Danes
Imaging
Centre
Bedford
Music
School
 
Royal
Holloway
Student
Residences.
Howe
Dell
Primary
School.
39-49
Wigmore
Street
 
1
Finsbury
Square
 
London
Bridge
Glass
Sculpture.
Hilton
London
Tower
Bridge.
Bishop Challoner
Catholic Collegiate
School.
 
Butterfield
Innovation
Centre.
 
Hanover
Street
Artwork.
 
Derby
Quad.
 
 
Queens
Apartments.
 
 
AA
Rainforest
Pavilion.
 
Qasr
Al
Muwaiji